Eye In The Sky

April 2, 2016
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This film is dedicated to the recently-late, great, Alan Rickman, and it’s a good one.  It raises interesting moral, ethical, and political questions.

Four highly-wanted terrorists are currently staying at a safe house in Nairobi, Kenya – a non-hostile country.  One of them is even a radicalized American citizen.  The British military, in charge of the original mission to “capture” the terrorists, is collaborating with the American military via a drone in Nairobi being piloted by two American soldiers at a Las Vegas military base.

The large piloted drone is spying on the safe house, while a mini-drone with a camera (disguised as a bird) flies into the house.  The hidden camera reveals that some of the terrorists are putting on suicide vests, loaded with explosives.  They will soon leave the house for a crowded civilian area, probably killing at least 80 innocent people!  With this new information, Colonel Katherine Powell (Helen Mirren), with the British military in Sussex, wants to change the mission to “kill” instead of “capture.”  The situation is now very complex, related to the issue of probable collateral damage, amongst other things.  British Lt. General Frank Benson (Alan Rickman), who is simultaneously sitting with a handful of  high-level British politicians in Whitehall, agrees with Powell, but some of the politicians oppose the “kill” mission for various moral, ethical, and political reasons.  They want to “refer up” to higher political authorities, in both England and the USA, in order to get clearance to proceed, but, in the process, waste precious time.

The film is very suspenseful as to what decision will finally be made, if the vested terrorists will leave the house before their decision finally gets made, and if the decision  to “kill” is made, what will be the collateral damage.  The script is well-written, and Mirren and Rickman are great, as usual.

The film will work fine as a rental, but it’s good enough to see now on the BS.  “I” liked “Eye in the Sky”and I doubt you will find it “droning” on.

 

 

This film is dedicated to the recently-late, great, Alan Rickman, and it's a good one.  It raises interesting moral, ethical, and political questions. Four highly-wanted terrorists are currently staying at a safe house in Nairobi, Kenya - a non-hostile country.  One of them is even a radicalized American citizen.  The British military, in charge of the original mission to "capture" the terrorists, is collaborating with the American military via a drone in Nairobi being piloted by two American soldiers at a Las Vegas military base. The large piloted drone is spying on the safe house, while a mini-drone with a camera (disguised as a bird) flies into the house.  The hidden camera reveals that some of the terrorists are putting on suicide vests, loaded with explosives.  They will soon leave the house for a crowded civilian area, probably killing at least 80 innocent people!  With this new information, Colonel Katherine Powell (Helen Mirren), with the British military in Sussex, wants to change the mission to "kill" instead of "capture."  The situation is now very complex, related to the issue of probable collateral damage, amongst other things.  British Lt. General Frank Benson (Alan Rickman), who is simultaneously sitting with a handful of  high-level British politicians in Whitehall, agrees with Powell, but some of the politicians oppose the "kill" mission for various moral, ethical, and political reasons.  They want to "refer up" to higher political authorities, in both England and the USA, in order to get clearance to proceed, but, in the process, waste precious time. The film is very suspenseful as to what decision will finally be made, if the vested terrorists will leave the house before their decision finally gets made, and if the decision  to "kill" is made, what will be the collateral damage.  The script is well-written, and Mirren and Rickman are great, as usual. The film will work fine as a rental, but it's good enough to see now on the BS.  "I" liked "Eye in the Sky"and I doubt you will find it "droning" on.    

7.5

Suspenseful and Thought-Provoking!

Alan Rickman's Final Film!
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8

I have loved the movies ever since I saw “The Wizard of Oz” as a young boy. When Beatle-mania hit the USA, Rock-N-Roll was my greatest passion, but I haven’t enjoyed the current music scene nearly as much over the past 15 years, so that void has been filled by film. In college and med school, I would see movies with my friends and we would stay up late into the night chatting about them. I still love seeing movies with friends and then having dinner to discuss them. This blog evolved out of my desire to tell my movie-loving friends about movies I thought they would enjoy. The blog allows me to do this in a fun way and to reach movie fans everywhere.

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